Seattle Mazda

We Make Money Work In Your Favor

This content shows Simple View

freelancers

Deducting Health Insurance Premiums When You’re Self-Employed

In this day and age, health insurance is something that we all need to have but have different ways of getting it. Health insurance is expensive. If you work for a company that offers insurance, you won’t have to worry about deducting it from your taxes, but if you have been paying out-of-pocket for your health insurance and living on a self-employed income, you might be able to deduct the total dollar amount from your taxes. There are specific criteria you will have to meet in order to be able to make this deduction. In this article, we will discuss what the self-employed health insurance is and how you can deduct your monthly health insurance premiums. 

What is the self-employed health insurance deduction?

Because it doesn’t require itemizing, the self-employed health insurance deduction is considered an “above the line” deduction. If you are able to claim it, doing so lowers your adjusted gross income (AGI). 

This tax deduction gives self-employed people an opportunity to deduct the following medical expenses:

  • Medical insurance.
  • Dental insurance.
  • Qualified long-term care insurance. 

One benefit of this tax deduction is that it’s not only useful for your own health insurance expenses. If you are paying for health insurance for dependents, children or your spouse, you may also deduct these premiums at the end of the tax year. 

How to claim the deduction if you are self-employed

If you are self-employed such as a freelancer or an independent contractor, you can deduct any health insurance premiums that you paid for yourself, your dependents, and your spouse. If you are a farmer, you would report your income on Schedule F and if you are another kind of sole proprietor, you would report on Schedule C. You may also be able to take this deduction if you are an active member of an LLC that is treated as a partnership, as long as you are taking in self-employed income. This same rule of thumb goes for those who are employed by S-corporations and own 2% or more of the company’s stock. Self-employed people who also pay supplemental Medicare premiums, such as those for Part B coverage can also deduct these. 

You won’t be able to take the deduction if:

  • You or your spouse were eligible for health insurance coverage through an employer and declined benefits. If you have a full-time job and are running your own business on the side, this could be a situation you face. Alternatively, perhaps your spouse works a regular full-time employer and had the option to add you to a health insurance plan through their job. 
  • Your self-employment income cannot be less than your insurance premiums. In other words, you must have earned an amount of taxable income that is equal to or greater than the amount you spent in healthcare premiums. For example, if your business was to earn $15,000 last year, but you spent $20,000 in health insurance premiums, you would only be able to deduct $15,000. If your business lost money, then you won’t be able to deduct at all. 

One of the major differences between the health insurance tax deduction and other tax deductions for self-employed people is that it’s not taken on a business return or a Schedule C. It is considered an income adjustment, in which case, you must claim it on Schedule 1 that is attached to your Form 1040 federal income tax return. 

Final Thoughts

Self-employed people, such as freelancers, independent contractors and small-business owners, might have the opportunity to deduct their health insurance premiums from their taxes. As long as your business made a profit for the previous tax year and you were not eligible for a group health insurance plan, you should be able to take this deduction. If you’re not sure whether or not you meet the criteria, you may seek advice from a tax professional. You will need to fill out all of the necessary forms to qualify for a deduction. To make this process as seamless as possible, it’s important to keep track of all your business records.

Deducting Health Insurance Premiums When You’re Self-Employed is a post from Pocket Your Dollars.

Source: pocketyourdollars.com



8 Free Sleep Apps for a Blissful Night’s Rest

Perfect for the multitasker, Endel offers “personalized soundscapes” for relaxation, better sleep and better focus. The app pulls data from your environment (like weather, location or time of day), then moderates sounds to match your mood: focus music for daytime work and chill sounds to help you sleep. The app comes with a 7-day free trial, after which point you’ll need to buy a subscription (.99 per month or .99 per year, at present) or use the free, browser-based version.
Find Endel in the Apple App Store, Google Play, or on Twitch.

1. White Noise

Source: thepennyhoarder.com
Find White Noise in the Apple App Store, Google Play or Amazon.

2. Relax and Sleep Well Hypnosis

Find Relax Melodies on the Apple App Store or Google Play.
Think of free podcast Nothing Much Happens as adult sleep stories designed to help you relax into a peaceful slumber. As the title suggests, the stories are fairly low-stakes. Podcast host Kathryn is a meditation and yoga teacher, so think of this as an extended savasana where it’s actually awesome if you end up snoring after five minutes.

3. Headspace

Hypnosis usually costs several hundred dollars, but you’ll pay Combining relaxing sounds, free sleep stories and guided meditation for sleep, lucid dreaming, or relief from medical conditions like tinnitus (ringing in the ears that often gets worse before bed), free sleep app Relax Melodies has thousands of fans. It comes with 52 sounds including white noise, nature sounds, ASMR (autonomous sensory meridian response, or that warm tingle associated with sounds like whispers) and binaural beats. Premium sounds are available as app purchases for .99.

Are you turning more to apps for wellness? Try these cheap or free meditation apps.

4. Deep Sleep With AJ

Find Rise in the Apple App Store or Google Play.
Find Relax and Sleep Well Hypnosis in the Apple App Store or Google Play.

5. Relax Melodies

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.
Find Nothing Much Happens on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts.

6. Nothing Much Happens

Most people experience sleep problems for a range of underlying causes, thus it can be helpful to have multiple free sleep apps on your phone. Armed with nature sounds, bedtime stories, guided meditation, science-backed sleep habits and hypnosis for life’s most pressing worries, you can stop counting sheep and cue up what’s mostly likely to help you get a good night’s sleep.
Headspace’s guided meditation app is the perfect way to wind down for bed: Andy’s soothing British accent will lull you into a state of total relaxation where it seems like nothing could ever go wrong. While it’s a year, Headspace often makes the best sleep apps lists. Students can pay .99 for annual access, and Netflix subscribers can watch the Headspace series for no extra cost. Each episode focuses on one style of meditation, so by the time you finish the season you’ll have a whole arsenal of relaxation techniques to try before bed.

7. Endel

Sign up for a free trial of Headspace or watch on Netflix.
While free sleep apps won’t solve your big-picture problems, they could help you fall asleep faster, so you can tackle life’s stressors feeling refreshed. Here are the best ones we’ve found.

FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM

8. Rise: Sleep & Energy Tracker

White noise free sleep apps are must-haves for travel, when you need a consistent noise to block out the sounds of other hotel guests, city noises, etc. The ‘lite’ version does the trick with free sleep sounds and nature sounds. For .99, you get 50 sounds plus the ability to create your own track that includes binaural beats, aka different frequencies that cue your brain to relax.
For those wanting a scientific approach to a good night’s sleep, the Rise sleep tracker app is worth checking out. It’s free to download with membership upgrades as app purchases beginning at .99 per month. Unlike sleep-tracking apps which just gauge your sleep cycle, Rise looks at “sleep debt”– aka how much sleep you should get but don’t. The sleep app works backward from your sleep debt numbers, drawing from sleep data and health information to help you improve sleep quality and quantity. Rise fans include pro sports teams and Fortune 500 leaders who find the price worth it to sleep better and wake up feeling refreshed.
Lindsey Danis is a contributor to The Penny Hoarder.
Whether it’s fear of getting sick, worry for a loved one’s health, job anxiety, the stress of juggling parenting and career in a pandemic, or all of the above, sky-high stress seems to be the new normal.
Find Deep Sleep With AJ on the Apple App Store or Google Play.
Deep Sleep With AJ is a cheaper alternative to Headspace, with a one-time cost of .99 and similarly dreamy Scottish accent. Developed by a mindfulness expert and therapist, the sleep app includes mindfulness and inspirational talks, bedtime relaxation techniques to help you wake up feeling refreshed, meditations for anxiety and panic attacks and more. You can cue up meditations to repeat a set number of times, so it ideally plays through until you’ve caught those Zs.



RVing on a Budget: The Biggest Costs and How to Save

What you may know about RVing: It’s a great, cheap way to travel, or even a low-cost alternative for living full time.

What you may not know: RVing costs can stack up, and even eclipse the cost of traditional car-and-hotel travel, or living in a sticks-and-bricks home.

Here, we’ll detail the primary expenses associated with the RV lifestyle, with tips to help you reduce them.

How to Go RVing on a Budget

As someone who’s traveled extensively by RV, and even lived in a travel trailer, I know exactly how much of a burden RVing can be on your budget. Here’s what I’ve learned.

The Vehicle Itself

The first thing you need to go RVing … is an RV. And depending on how you source it, this first purchase can be very pricy.

First-timers are more likely to rent than buy, but if you end up falling in love with the lifestyle, you should know that even modest motorhomes cost tens of thousands of dollars. Super luxurious ones go for over $1 million. (Yes, seriously.)

Travel trailers tend to be less expensive than motorcoaches for a comparable level of quality, from entry level all the way up to the top. Keep in mind, though, that you need a vehicle capable of towing the rig around.

A young man sweeps out an RV

But let’s go back to the rental option. Expect to see per-night prices of $250 or more, which can easily outstrip a moderately priced hotel room. Additional fees for mileage and insurance can push your bottom line even higher.

Consider looking at peer-to-peer RV rental marketplaces, like RVshare or Outdoorsy, where you can rent a rig directly from its private owner, which often means lower rental prices. (Think of it like Airbnb for RVs.)

You may also be able to find super-cheap rentals through RV relocation deals, in which you serve as a rental company’s courier, delivering RVs to destinations where they are in demand. In return, you get use of the rig for a steal — but keep in mind you’ll be limited in your ability to personalize your itinerary. You’ll have to stick to the company’s route and timetable.

As far as buying is concerned, shop around — and consider shopping gently used. RV does stand for recreational vehicle, after all, and although the loan you take out might look more like a mortgage than auto financing, you probably aren’t going to be building equity. You don’t want to go too old, because maintenance starts to become a problem, but something three to five years old could save you a nice chunk of change.

A motorhome travels through Arches National Park, Utah.

Fuel

The appeal of RVs is simple: You get to bring everything along with you for the trip, including the kitchen sink.

But all of those accommodations and extras are weighty, which means that all but the smallest RVs are pretty serious gas guzzlers. Case in point: The largest Class A motorhomes get as little as 4-6 miles to the gallon.

If you’re hoping to save at the pump, consider taking a vacation closer to home or narrowing down to a single destination. Not only will you spend less money on gas, you’ll also spend less of your time driving.

Campsite Accommodation Costs

Many people think you can load up into an RV, hit the road and just pull off to the side when you’re ready to catch some sleep.

But in most cases, that’s not true. Although some rest stops and big box store parking lots allow overnight RV parking, many do not. Besides, do you really want to spend your vacation sleeping under the glare of 24/7 floodlights?

The most comfortable campgrounds — the ones where you can hook up to electricity, water, and sewer connections — can cost a pretty penny, especially in highly sought-after destinations. Malibu Beach may be an extreme example, but during peak seasons, you’re looking at about $100 per night for a basic site, and up to $230 for a premium location. (Remember, that’s on top of your rental price. And fuel.)

A woman makes coffee in her travel trailer.

But you can find resort-style accommodations for $35 to $50 per night, often with discounts available for veterans, military members or those staying a week or longer. There are also a variety of camping discount clubs that can help you score lower-cost campground accommodations.

You’ll also want to look into state parks, which often offer RV sites with hookups for prices much lower than privately owned campgrounds (though they may not have a cell signal).

Finally, there are places you can camp for free (or super cheap), but even in an RV, you’ll kind of be roughing it. On BLM-managed land and in certain other wilderness locations, you can do “dispersed” camping, otherwise known as “boondocking” or “dry camping” — basically, camping without any hookups.

But you need to check ahead of time to make sure that cool-looking space is actually okay to park in and not privately owned. There isn’t always appropriate signage, and if you accidentally end up in someone’s backyard, you may be asked to move or even ticketed. Some great resources for finding spots include Campendium and FreeCampsites.net.

FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM
No spend challenge
12/14/20 @ 2:48 PM
Debi Hoyt
Saving money
12/7/20 @ 1:17 AM
r
Credit Karma Savings Account
10/15/20 @ 12:02 PM
Leslie Kay
See more in Save Money or ask a money question

Maintenance and Storage

If you buy an RV, you should be prepared for costs associated with maintenance — and, if you can’t park it on your own property, storage. In Portland, Oregon, I pay $75 a month to keep my travel trailer in an uncovered lot. More desirable, secure storage is almost $200.

Then there are the maintenance costs of both the vehicular and household systems of an RV, which need regular upkeep. Doing it yourself may be time intensive, but even a minor trip to the repair shop can mean a major bill.

It’s best if you already have a place in mind to keep it — and the initiative to learn some DIY mechanics. There’s a YouTube tutorial for most RV repair and maintenance basics.

Overall, the great thing about RVing is that the expenses are easily modified to fit almost any budget — you may just have to rethink which RV you drive, where you’re going and how you’ll be staying once you get there.

Jamie Cattanach’s work has been featured at Fodor’s, Yahoo, SELF, The Huffington Post, The Motley Fool and other outlets. Learn more at www.jamiecattanach.com.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com




top