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What to Know Before Buying a Foreclosed Home

If you’ve been keeping your eye on real estate home listings, you might’ve seen more foreclosed properties for sale at a reduced price. 

With record levels of unemployment and underemployment, many homeowners are falling further behind on their mortgages. Currently, there’s a federal moratorium on the most common mortgage programs through December 31, 2020. Unless further homeowner protections are in place, the foreclosure market will see an unfortunate rise.

In fact, according to mortgage and real estate analytics company Black Knight, 2.3 million homeowners are already seriously past-due on their mortgages. 

As devastating as it is to have more homes undergoing foreclosure, it also means that prospective home buyers, who were otherwise priced out of buying a home, might have greater access to homeownership. Here’s what you should know if you’re thinking about buying a foreclosed home.

Buying a Foreclosed Home 

There are many ways you can buy a foreclosed home, depending on what stage of the process the foreclosure is in:

  • Pre-foreclosure. Many homeowners are willing to sell before they’ve officially been foreclosed on. Depending on how much equity they have, they might need to do a short sale. 
  • Short sale. Homeowners can seek approval from their lenders to sell you the home for less than they owe on the mortgage. The bank will get less than it’s owed, but it still often approves short sales since they usually cost less than a foreclosure. 
  • Auction. Once a home is foreclosed it’ll often be auctioned off by the bank. But you’ll need cash on hand for this, and that’s not an option for most folks who need mortgage financing. 
  • Real-estate owned (REO) properties. Alternatively, banks can simply sell the foreclosed home through more traditional markets, just like a normal home.

It’s usually easiest to buy the foreclosed home once the bank takes over and it becomes an REO property. That’s because you can take your time and go through the mortgage underwriting process. You can also work with a realtor, and — importantly — write contingency clauses in the contract that let you pull out of the deal if a home inspection reveals more repairs than you expected. 

7 Caveats to Buying a Foreclosed Home

Buying a foreclosed home isn’t exactly the same as buying one directly from the homeowner. You’re potentially buying a home from a bank who took over after the previous homeowners were unable to afford the home anymore. This introduces a few twists into the home-buying process for you. 

1. You’ll Need a Realtor Who Specializes in Foreclosed Homes

The world is full of realtors, even including your Uncle Bob and Cousin Carolyn. But not everyone is equipped to handle the nuances of buying a foreclosed home. There are a lot of issues that can crop up — unplanned property damage, squatters, homeowners who settle the bill and try to reclaim ownership, etc.

If you’re serious about buying a foreclosed home, seek out a realtor with extra experience in this area. There are even special designations that some realtors can get, such as Short Sales and Foreclosure Resource (SFR) or Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE).

2. Houses Are Sold “As-Is”

With a typical home sale, you have the change to get the property professionally inspected before signing on the dotted line. It’s not uncommon for new issues to arise, and in a normal home buying transaction, you can often negotiate with the sellers to either fix the damage or discount the price. 

That’s not the case when you buy a foreclosed home. If a home inspection reveals unexpected damage — like the need for a full roof or a septic system replacement — banks often aren’t willing to negotiate. It’s a take-it-or-leave-it sale. 

3. Expect to Put In Some Work

The above point is especially important considering that most foreclosed homes do, in fact, need a lot of fixing up. 

Think about it: the previous homeowners lost the house because they couldn’t afford the mortgage. There’s a good chance they also weren’t able to keep up with routine maintenance either. From their perspective, even if they did have the cash, what’s the point of spending money on repairs, if they know they’ll lose the home in a few months?

You can save money by putting in some sweat equity (HGTV, anyone?), but even then you’ll need the cash to pay for materials. This also means that the home might not be move-in ready. If you do move in, you might need to put up with construction debris for a little while. On the bright side, though, this does give you a chance to upgrade the home to your own aesthetics. 

4. You Might Need Creative Financing

This brings up another issue: how do you pay for those renovations? Generally, you can’t just ask for a bigger mortgage to cover the necessary repairs. Most lenders will only lend you as much as the current home appraisal is worth, minus your down payment. 

You have a few options, though. You can hold some money back from your savings to pay for it in cash, but this means you’ll have a smaller down payment. An alternative is getting a loan from a different lender, like a personal loan, a 0% APR credit card, or even a home equity loan or line of credit if you’re lucky enough to start from a position with equity. 

Finally, there are some special “renovation mortgages” available through Fannie Mae and other lenders. These mortgages actually do allow you to take out a bigger mortgage so you can pay for renovations. You might need to provide a higher down payment or have a higher credit score to qualify, however. 

5. Watch for Liens on Foreclosed Homes at Auctions

If you have a big pot of cash and can pay for a home on the same day, an auction might be your best bet. But then you have to worry about a new factor: liens. 

If the property had any liens attached to it (such as from the previous homeowners not paying their taxes, or a judgement from unpaid debt), you’ll inherit that bill, too. 

This is usually only the case for auctioned homes. If you buy a foreclosed home as an REO sale, the bank generally pays off any liens attached to the property. Still, it may be worth double-checking if you have interest in a specific property. 

6. Be Prepared to Act Fast

You’re not the only one with the bright idea to get a low-priced, foreclosed home. Chances are good that there are a few other buyers interested in the property, which increases competition. Even though the home is listed at a big discount, this competition can still drive prices up. You might need to be ready to act fast, just the same as in any hot real estate market. 

7. Be Prepared to Wait

On the flip side, there’s a lot of extra bureaucracy involved in buying a foreclosed home once the seller accepts your offer. There’s often extra paperwork to fill out or other complications. 

For example, the home appraisal might come back lower than expected, which might make it harder to get enough financing for the agreed-on purchase price. If it’s a short sale, it might also take longer for the bank to approve the lower sale price for the home, based on what the homeowner’s mortgage is currently worth. 

Pros and Cons of Foreclosed Homes 

Buying a foreclosed home isn’t necessarily a good or bad idea on its own. It all depends on your own goals — for example, are you willing to figure out financing for repairs to get a deal on the home purchase price? Also consider how important it is for you to have a “move-in ready” home with no hassle. 

Weigh these pros and cons carefully, and what’s most important to you when buying a home. 

Pros Cons
Can get a deal that’s lower than market price Property is sold “as-is” and might not be move-in ready
Can customize the home to your specifications with repairs and upgrades Likely needs a lot of repairs and upgrades 
Requires creative financing for repairs and upgrades
Foreclosure process is long and might fall through 

The Bottom Line

Buying a foreclosed home can be a win-win situation. You get a home at a good price, and (usually) you can bring the property back to good, working order by fixing it up. As long as you go into the deal knowing that it’s not the same experience as a typical home purchase, buying a foreclosed home is a great way to launch into homeownership or real estate investing.   

The post What to Know Before Buying a Foreclosed Home appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com



How to Avoid the Financial Blunders People Make in Their 20s

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Nobody is perfect when it comes to their finances — even millionaires slip up sometimes.

So when you start to think you’re worse off than your parents, or your nephew, or your friends, remember that all 20-somethings have made mistakes that can cost them big time.

But if you’re guilty of making some of these blunders, don’t fret. You can still redeem yourself! Here are some of the worst blunders you can make, and tips to help dig you out of the hole.

Blunder No. 1: Not Getting Free Gift Cards When You Shop

What do you usually do with your receipts? You check out, they hand you a mile-long piece of paper, and you frantically stuff it to the bottom of a grocery bag. Pretty worthless.

But a free app called Fetch Rewards will turn them into gift cards. It partners with tons of brands to give you points for every grocery receipt you share. Then you can exchange them for gift cards to places like Amazon, Walmart, Chipotle and dozens of other retailers.

And it’s perfect for those of us who don’t want to put a ton of work into this. All you have to do is send Fetch a photo of your receipt, and it does everything for you. No scanning barcodes or searching for offers — and you can use it with any grocery receipt.

When you download the app, use the code PENNY to automatically earn 2,000 points when you scan your first receipt. Then start snapping photos of your recent receipts to see how many points you can earn without a single trip to the store!

Not so bad for a useless receipt, right?

Blunder No. 2: Not Earning Anything On Your Savings

You’ve probably heard the best way to grow your money is to stick it in a savings account and leave it there for, well, ever. That’s bad advice.

But maybe you’re just looking for a place to safely stash it away — but still earn money. Under your mattress or in a safe will get you nothing. And a typical savings account won’t do you much better. (Ahem, 0.05% is nothing these days.)

But a debit card called Aspiration lets you earn up to 5% cash back and up to 20 times the average interest on the money in your account.

Not too shabby!

Enter your email address here to get a free Aspiration Spend and Save account. After you confirm your email, securely link your bank account so they can start helping you get extra cash. Your money is FDIC insured and they use a military-grade encryption which is nerd talk for “this is totally safe.”

Blunder No. 3: Paying Too Much Interest To Credit Card Companies

If you have credit card debt, you know. The anxiety, the interest rates, the fear you’re never going to escape…

And the truth is, your credit card company doesn’t really care. It’s just getting rich by ripping you off with high interest rates. But a website called AmOne wants to help.

If you owe your credit card companies $50,000 or less, AmOne will match you with a low-interest loan you can use to pay off every single one of your balances.

The benefit? You’ll be left with one bill to pay each month. And because personal loans have lower interest rates (AmOne rates start at 3.49% APR), you’ll get out of debt that much faster. Plus: No credit card payment this month.

AmOne keeps your information confidential and secure, which is probably why after 20 years in business, it still has an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau.

It takes two minutes to see if you qualify for up to $50,000 online. You do need to give AmOne a real phone number in order to qualify, but don’t worry — they won’t spam you with phone calls.

Blunder No. 4: Paying Too Much For Car Insurance

When’s the last time you checked car insurance prices?

You should shop your options every six months or so — it could save you some serious money. Let’s be real, though. It’s probably not the first thing you think about when you wake up. But it doesn’t have to be.

A website called Insure.com makes it super easy to compare car insurance prices. All you have to do is enter your ZIP code and your age, and it’ll show you your options.

Using Insure.com, people have saved an average of $540 a year.

Yup. That could be $500 back in your pocket just for taking a few minutes to look at your options.

Blunder No. 5: Thinking You Don’t Have Enough Money To Invest

Take a look at the Forbes Richest People list, and you’ll notice almost all the billionaires have one thing in common — they own another company.

But if you work for a living and don’t happen to have millions of dollars lying around, that can sound totally out of reach.

But with an app called Stash, it doesn’t have to be. It lets you be a part of something that’s normally exclusive to the richest of the rich — on Stash you can buy pieces of other companies for as little as $1.

That’s right — you can invest in pieces of well-known companies, such as Amazon, Google, Apple and more for as little as $1. The best part? If these companies profit, so can you. Some companies even send you a check every quarter for your share of the profits, called dividends.1

It takes two minutes to sign up, and it’s totally secure. With Stash, all your investments are protected by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC) — that’s industry talk for, “Your money’s safe.”2

Plus, when you use the link above, Stash will give you a $5 sign-up bonus once you deposit $5 into your account.*

Blunder No. 6: Assuming Life Insurance Is Expensive And Time Consuming

Have you thought about how your family would manage without your income after you’re gone? How they’ll pay the bills? Send the kids through school? Now’s a good time to start planning for the future by looking into a term life insurance policy.

You’re probably thinking: I don’t have the time or money for that. But your application can take minutes — and you could leave your family up to $1 million with a company called Bestow.

Rates start at just $16 a month. The peace of mind knowing your family is taken care of is priceless.

If you’re under the age of 54 and want to get a fast life insurance quote without a medical exam or even getting up from the couch, get a free quote from Bestow.

1Not all stocks pay out dividends, and there is no guarantee that dividends will be paid each year.

2To note, SIPC coverage does not insure against the potential loss of market value.

For Securities priced over $1,000, purchase of fractional shares starts at $0.05.

*Offer is subject to Promotion Terms and Conditions. To be eligible to participate in this Promotion and receive the bonus, you must successfully open an individual brokerage account in good standing, link a funding account to your Invest account AND deposit $5.00 into your Invest account.

The Penny Hoarder is a Paid Affiliate/partner of Stash. 

Investment advisory services offered by Stash Investments LLC, an SEC registered investment adviser. This material has been distributed for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended as investment, legal, accounting, or tax advice. Investing involves risk. 

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com



Credit Union Vs. Bank Mortgage: Which Should You Choose?

Couple being handed the keys to their new home

You’ve saved up your money, you found the perfect house, and you’re ready to buy. Now you just need a mortgage. Commercial banks may be the obvious choice, but they aren’t the only option for your mortgage. Mortgage brokers, online mortgage lenders, and credit unions also originate mortgage loans.

Credit unions and other non-banks are gaining in popularity for mortgage originations. In fact, credit unions accounted for 9% of all mortgage originations in 2017. If you’re ready to take out a mortgage on your dream home, here’s what we think you should know about credit union vs. bank mortgages.

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The Advantages of Getting a Mortgage through a Credit Union

Credit unions operate like banks, but they are non-profit organizations with specific membership requirements. Members of the credit union are the collective owners of the union, offering some distinct advantages for mortgage origination. Credit unions may offer lower rates, easier approval, greater personalization, and more. Here are four advantages of working with a credit union vs. a bank for your mortgage.

Easier Approval

In general, credit unions are more likely to lend to people with poor credit scores and offer options for smaller down payments. Credit unions are also more likely to hold onto the mortgages they originate, rather than selling them like banks often do. When a bank sells a mortgage, outside investors drive the interest rates and underwriting standards, limiting the bank’s flexibility with mortgage terms. When credit unions don’t sell mortgages, they can be more flexible with who they loan to and what rates they offer.

In addition to having more flexible qualification options, credit unions prioritize customer service­—not profits. They want to help their members find the options that work best for them, their community, and the credit union membership as a whole. Plus, if you’re already a member of a credit union, it’s generally easier to get additional services through an institution you already have a relationship with. You may even be pre-approved for a mortgage based on your prior account activity.

Lower Rates

Because credit unions are exempt from paying federal taxes and prioritize breaking even, not making a profit, they can offer higher interest rates for deposits and lower interest rates for loans.

Overall, credit union rates tend to be lower for all loan types, including credit cards, but rates for mortgages may be similar to those from traditional banks if they sell their mortgages. Even a small difference in interest rate can make a big difference over the life of a mortgage, though, so any little bit helps.

Fewer Fees

There are many unavoidable costs of taking out a mortgage: closing costs, vendor fees, insurance. Many banks and mortgage brokers will also charge origination fees and other processing costs. Because credit unions are less concerned with turning a profit, originating a mortgage with one will often result in fewer origination fees and other processing costs. These reduced fees can potentially save you several hundred to several thousand dollars.

More Personalization

Credit unions prioritize customer service for their members. Banks, on the other hand, are primarily motivated by profits. You may get a better, more personalized experience by working with a credit union to originate your mortgage. Because credit unions more often hold on to their mortgages, you’re more likely to work with them for the life of the loan. They also often offer special rewards programs and incentives for first-time home buyers or no-down-payment plans.

Depending on the credit union you’re a part of, it may also be better able to provide specific advice and context for loans. For example, credit unions specifically for veterans may have more hands-on expertise with VA loans. Similarly, geographically based credit unions may have better understanding of local incentives for mortgages.

During times of crisis, like the coronavirus pandemic, credit unions may be more attuned to the needs of their customers and therefore more likely to offer financial hardship support. Reach out to your credit union if you need support or resources.

The Disadvantages of Originating a Mortgage with a Credit Union

Because credit unions are smaller, membership-based organizations, there are some disadvantages to working with one for your mortgage. Here are five things to keep in mind if you’re considering a credit union vs. bank mortgage.

Membership Requirements

While traditional banks open accounts with anyone who qualifies, credit union memberships have additional specific requirements and limitations depending on the union. If you do not meet those requirements, you cannot originate your mortgage with that credit union, even if it would be the best deal for you. You can find credit unions in your area that you may qualify for using CUlookup.com.

Fewer Locations

Credit unions are smaller and often more geographically limited than national banks. That means you’ll have fewer options for in-person service. In fact, credit unions have an average of three branches while most banks have an average of 16. Many credit unions still operate traditional banker’s hours—9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday—as well, limiting your options for service.

Dated Technology

Online services are becoming increasingly important to consumers who require and expect quick and easy self-serve online options. Credit unions are generally behind the times when it comes to technology, which means you may not be able to use an app or find other self-serve options online if you have questions. They are quickly catching up to traditional banks, though, so this may not be much of a disadvantage moving forward.

Limited Financing Options

Banks and credit unions fund mortgages and other loans with cash on hand and borrowed from other institutions. In order to lend more money to members, they must have more money available. Because credit unions typically have a smaller customer base, they tend to have less cash on hand to loan out, which may curtail loans available. Banks are, on average, 13 times larger than credit unions with $2.6 billion in assets vs. $207 million in assets for credit unions.

Insurance

The FDIC does not cover credit unions. Instead, the NCUA regulates federally insured credit unions and provides similar insurance coverage as the FDIC. Some credit unions are state chartered, however, and may be covered by a state agency or offer private insurance coverage instead. Private insurance is held to same regulatory standards but is generally considered less secure than federally chartered coverage. The NCAU Credit Union Locator can verify whether a credit union is federally chartered.

While the type of insurance an institution uses does not directly affect the terms of your mortgage, it should still be part of your consideration process for working with a credit union over a bank.

Credit Union vs. Bank Mortgage

When you’re ready to take out a mortgage, you have a lot of options. Like with other financial decisions, you should shop around across credit unions, banks and other lenders to find the best deal for you. And if you’re not getting the rate you think you deserve, working to improve your credit score is one of the best ways to increase your chances of getting a competitive mortgage rate.

Check your credit report using the free Credit Report Card. You can also find more resources, including a free, no-obligation quote, in our Loan Resource Center.

Sign Up Now

The post Credit Union Vs. Bank Mortgage: Which Should You Choose? appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com




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