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Newly Renovated, 1915-Built Townhouse in Park Slope Asks $4.4 Million

A four-bedroom townhouse with park views and tons of charm has recently hit the market, and we’re dying to tell you all about it. The listing, brought to market by Compass’ Michael J. Franco, is right next to Prospect Park, Brooklyn’s second largest park, and has plenty of outdoor space (and a rooftop deck to boot).

The townhouse sits in one of Brooklyn’s trendiest, most desirable neighborhoods — Park Slope — with its leafy streets lined with brick and brownstone townhouses, many of which were built near the turn of the 20th century and have been lovingly updated over the decades by young families migrating from Manhattan. Much like its neighboring properties, the 2,600-square-foot townhome at 15 Prospect Park was originally built more than a century ago in 1915 and retains its old-world charm — but has been carefully updated to meet modern standards of living.

beautiful townhouse in prospect park, Brooklyn
Park Slope townhouse on the market for $4.4 million. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco

With 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, a generously sized living room, and a finished basement, the Brooklyn townhouse also comes with a few rare features for a New York home: ample outdoor space and private parking (that includes a private garage and its own driveway).

The layout is split on three levels, with the first floor housing a large living room and open dining room — both with distinctive pre-war features like classic moldings and arches — and a renovated kitchen that opens up to a lovely terrace.

inside a beautiful pre-war townhouse in Park Slope, Brooklyn
Beautiful living space with distinctive pre-war features like arches and moldings. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco
dining room of a pre-war townhouse in park slope, Brooklyn
Beautiful living space with distinctive pre-war features like arches and moldings. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco
renovated kitchen in Brooklyn townhouse
The renovated kitchen. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco
lovely terrace of a pre-war townhouse in Park Slope, Brooklyn
The Park Slope townhouse has a lovely terrace. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco

The second floor is home to 3 bedrooms and a sizeable landing which is perfect for either a library or a home office, while the third floor is dedicated to the primary bedroom suite and its massive walk-in closet, renovated bath with skylights and soaring ceilings, with a separate sitting area/den. The third level also provides access to the townhouse’s own rooftop deck, which adds more outdoor space and looks like a perfect place to entertain guests.

bedroom of a charming brooklyn townhouse in park slope
Bedroom opens up to Prospect Park views. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco
bathroom with skylight in brooklyn townhouse
 Renovated bath with skylights and soaring ceilings. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco
roof deck of a brooklyn townhouse in park slope
Rooftop deck of the $4.4 million townhouse in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Image credit: Compass//Michael J. Franco

The property is listed for $4,400,000 with Compass associate real estate broker Michael J. Franco.

More beautiful New York City homes

This Brooklyn Condo Has a Dreamy Backyard that Will Make You Forget You’re in the City
Trophy Apartment Once Owned by Composer Leonard Bernstein Asks $29.5 Million
These 5 Unique Listings Will Remind You of Everything that Makes NYC Real Estate Special
This $16M NYC Penthouse Has Unobstructed Views of Central Park and the Manhattan Skyline

The post Newly Renovated, 1915-Built Townhouse in Park Slope Asks $4.4 Million appeared first on Fancy Pants Homes.

Source: fancypantshomes.com



Indoor Wellness: How to Recreate the Ultimate Interior Design Trend of 2020

Within the past few years, we’ve seen a growing interest in everything wellness. With a more mindful approach on how we approach our day-to-day lives, the emphasis is now placed on maintaining our mental and emotional health, as we are actively working to ensure that all aspects of our lives remain balanced — our homes included. This is why the real estate wellness market soared in 2017 to one billion dollars. But what about us regular homeowners, who weren’t lucky enough to buy homes designed in such a fashion? Well, this is where interior design comes in to lend a

Source: fancypantshomes.com



How Much Life Insurance Do I Really Need?

Since it doesn’t have an immediate benefit – like health or auto insurance – life insurance may be the most underestimated insurance type there is. But if you die, life insurance will likely be the single most important policy type you’ve ever purchased.

And that’s why you have to get it right. Not only do you need a policy, but you need the right amount of coverage. Buying a flat amount of coverage and hoping for the best isn’t a strategy. There are specific numbers that go into determining how much life insurance you need. There are even numbers that can reduce the amount you need.

Calculate what that number is, compare it with any life insurance you currently have, and get busy buying a policy to cover the amount you don’t have. I’ll not only show you how much that is, but also where you can get the lowest cost life insurance possible.

How to Calculate How Much Life Insurance You Need

To make it easier for you to find out how much life insurance you need we’re providing the life insurance calculator below. Just input the information requested, and the calculator will do all the number crunching for you. You’ll know exactly how much coverage you’ll need, which will prepare you for the next step in the process – getting quotes from top life insurance companies.

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Now that you have an idea how much life insurance you need, the next step is to get quotes from top life insurance companies for their best life insurance products. And the best way to get the most coverage for the lowest premium is by getting quotes from several companies. Use the quote tool below from our life insurance partner to get those offers:

What to Consider when Purchasing Life Insurance

To answer the question of how much life insurance do I need, you’ll first need to break down the factors that will give you the magic number. You can use a rule of thumb, like the popularly quoted buy 10 times your annual income, but that’s little more than a rough estimate. If you use that as your guide, you may even end up paying for more coverage than you need, or worse – not have enough insurance.

Let’s take a look at the various components that will give you the right number for your policy.

Your Basic Living Expenses

If you’re not using budget software to track this number, a good strategy is to review and summarize your expenses for the past 12 months.

When you come up with that number, the next step is to multiply it by the number of years you want your life insurance policy to cover.

For example, let’s say your youngest child is five years old and you want to be able to provide for your family for at least 20 years. If the cost of your basic living expenses is $40,000 per year, you’ll need $800,000 over 20 years.

Now if your spouse is also employed, and likely to remain so after your death, you can subtract his or her contribution to your annual expenses.

If your spouse contributes $20,000 per year to your basic living expenses, you can cut the life insurance requirement in half, allowing $400,000 to cover basic living expenses.

But in considering whether or not your spouse will continue to work after your death, you’ll need to evaluate if that’s even possible. For example, if you have young, dependent children, your spouse may need to quit work and take care of them.

Alternatively, if you have a non-working spouse, there’ll be no contribution from his or her income toward basic living expenses.

In either case, your need to cover basic living expenses will go back up to $800,000.

Providing for Your Dependents

It may be tempting to assume your dependents will be provided for out of the insurance amount you determine for basic living expenses. But because children go through different life stages, there may be additional expenses.

The most obvious is providing for college education. With the average cost of in-state college tuition currently running at $9,410 per year, you may want to gross that up to $20,000 to allow for books, fees, room and board and other costs. You can estimate a four-year cost of $80,000 per child. If you have two children, you’ll need to provide $160,000 out of life insurance.

Now it may be possible that one or more of your children may qualify for a scholarship or grant, but that should never be assumed. If anything, college costs will be higher by the time your children are enrolled, and any additional funds you budget for will be quickly used up.

Life insurance is an opportunity to make sure that even if you aren’t around to provide for your children’s education, they won’t need to take on crippling student loan debts to make it happen.

But apart from college, you may also need to provide extra life insurance coverage for childcare. If your spouse does work, and is expected to continue even after your death, care for your children will be necessary.

If childcare in your area costs $12,000 per year per child, and you currently have a nine-year-old and a 10-year-old, you’ll need to cover that cost for a total of five years, assuming childcare is no longer necessary by age 12. That will include three years for your nine-year-old and two years for your 10-year-old. It will require increasing your life insurance policy by $60,000 ($12,000 X five years).

Paying Off Debt

This is the easiest number to calculate since you can just pull the balances from your credit report.

The most obvious debt you’ll want paid off is your mortgage. Since it’s probably the biggest single debt you have, getting it paid off upon your death will go a long way toward making your family’s financial life easier after you’re gone.

You may also consider paying off any car loans you or your spouse have. But you’ll only be paying off those loans that exist at the time of your death. It’s likely your spouse will need a new car loan in a few years. Use your best judgment on this one.

But an even more important loan to pay off is any student loan debt. Though federal student loans will be canceled upon your death, that’s not always true with private student loans. Unless you know for certain that your loan(s) will be canceled, it’s best to make an additional allowance to pay them off.

Credit cards are a difficult loan type to include in a life insurance policy. The reason is because of the revolving nature of credit card debt. If your death is preceded by an extended period of incapacitation your family may turn to credit cards to deal with uncovered medical expenses, income shortfalls, and even stress-related issues. An estimate may be the best you can do here.

Still another important category is business debts, if you have any. Most business debts require a personal guarantee on your part, and would be an obligation of your estate upon your death. If you have this kind of debt, you’ll want to provide for it to be paid off in your policy.

Covering Final Expenses

These are the most basic reasons to have life insurance, but in today’s high cost world, it’s probably one of the smallest components of your policy.

When we think of final expenses, funeral costs quickly come to mind. An average funeral can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $10,000, depending on individual preferences.

But funeral costs are hardly the only costs associated with total final expenses.

We’ve already mentioned uncovered medical costs. If you’re not going to include a provision for these elsewhere in your policy considerations, you’ll need to make a general estimate here. At a minimum, you should assume the full amount of the out-of-pocket costs on your health insurance plan.

But that’s just the starting point. There may be thousands of dollars in uncovered costs, due to special care that may be required if your death is preceded by an extended illness.

A ballpark estimate may be the best you can do.

Possible Reductions in the Amount of Life Insurance You Need

What’s that? Reductions in the amount of life insurance I need? It’s not as out-in-orbit as you may think – even though any life insurance agent worth his or her salt will do their best to ignore this entirely. But if you’re purchasing your own life insurance, you can and should take these into consideration. It’s one of the ways you can avoid buying more life insurance than you actually need.

What are some examples of possible reductions?

Current financial assets.

Let’s say you calculate you’ll need a life insurance policy for $1 million. But you currently have $300,000 in financial assets. Since those assets will be available to help provide for your family, you can deduct them from the amount of life insurance you’ll need.

Your spouse’s income.

We’ve already covered this in calculating your basic living expenses. But if you haven’t, you should still factor it into the equation, at least if your spouse is likely to continue working.

If you need a $1 million life insurance policy, but your spouse will contribute $25,000 per year (for 20 years) toward your basic living expenses, you’ll be able to cut your life insurance need in half.

But be careful here! Your spouse may need to either reduce his or her work schedule, or even quit entirely. Either outcome is a possibility for reasons you might not be able to imagine right now.

What About a Work Related Life Insurance Policy?

While it may be tempting to deduct the anticipated proceeds from a job-related life insurance policy from your personal policy, I urge extreme caution here.

The basic problem is employment related life insurance is not permanent life insurance. Between now and the time of your death, you could change jobs to one that offers a much smaller policy. You might even move into a new occupation that doesn’t provide life insurance at all.

There’s also the possibility your coverage may be terminated because of factors leading up to your death. For example, if you contract a terminal illness you may be forced to leave your job months or even years before your death. If so, you may lose your employer policy with your departure.

My advice is to consider a work policy as a bonus. If it’s there at the time of your death, great – your loved ones will have additional financial resources. But if it isn’t, you’ll be fully prepared with a right-sized private policy.

Example: Your Life Insurance Requirements

Let’s bring all these variables together and work an example that incorporates each factor.

Life insurance needs:

  • Basic living expenses – $40,000 per year for 20 years – $800,000
  • College education – $80,000 X 2 children – $160,000
  • Childcare – for two children for 5 years at $12,000 per year – $60,000
  • Payoff debt – mortgage ($250,000), student loans ($40,000), credit cards ($10,000) – $300,000
  • Final expenses – using a ballpark estimate – $30,000
  • Total gross insurance need – $1,350,000

Reductions in anticipated life insurance needs:

  • Current financial assets – $300,000
  • Spouse’s contribution toward living expenses – $20,000 per year for 20 years – $400,000
  • Total life insurance reductions – $700,000

Based on the above totals, by subtracting $700,000 in life insurance reductions from the gross insurance need of $1,350,000, leaves you with $650,000. At that amount, your family should be adequately provided for upon your death, and the amount you should consider for your life insurance policy.

Once again, if you have life insurance at work, think of it as a bonus only.

The Bottom Line

Once you know how much life insurance you need, it’s time to purchase a policy. Now is the best time to do that. Life insurance becomes more expensive as you get older, and if you develop a serious health condition, it may even be impossible to get. That’s why I have to emphasize that you act now.

Crunch the numbers to find out how much life insurance you need, then get quotes using the quote tool above. The sooner you do, the less expensive your policy will be.

The post How Much Life Insurance Do I Really Need? appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com



Is It Real? The Creepy Mansion in ‘The Haunting of Hill House’

We recently covered the new Haunting of Bly Manor, director Mike Flanagan’s so-called sequel to the epic mini-series The Haunting of Hill House. And while we were anxiously waiting for the series to drop on Netflix, we thought we’d try to distract ourselves by taking a trip down memory lane and re-watching the first season. 

Are the two seasons connected? Kind of.

Now, the two parts have nothing to do with each other in terms of plot, but you’ll get to see some familiar faces from the first series. Director Mike Flanagan is obviously taking cues from American Horror Story, which tends to re-cast the same actors in each season, much to our delight. 

Another thing that the two seasons have in common is a central character in the form of a mansion that brings all the other characters together. Both The Haunting of Hill House and The Haunting of Bly Manor are based on iconic gothic novels, namely Shirley Jackson’s Haunting of Hill House and Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw

While Bly Manor, according to James’ short novel, is welcoming and warm, bearing no signs whatsoever of anything evil lurking inside it, Hill House is a different story. Mike Flanagan might have strayed from the plot and the characters found in Jackson’s novel, but the central character is the same: a classic, creepy, dark and mysterious haunted mansion. 

The House in The Haunting of Hill House.
The House in The Haunting of Hill House. Image credit: Steve Dietl/Netflix

Hill House’s dark allure

Hill House, both in the novel and in the Netflix adaptation, is sinister-looking, unwelcoming, ominous even, like a warning to those who dare enter. In Flanagan’s version, Hill House is a living and breathing organism that manages to haunt the Crain family for decades, luring them back one by one. 

The Crain family, which includes Hugh and Olivia and their children, Theo, Nell, Shirley, Luke, and Steven, moves into Hill House as the parents have a passion for flipping houses. Hugh and Olivia plan to renovate the crumbling mansion and then sell it to build their dream house, designed by Olivia herself. However, Hill House has other plans in store for the Crains.

Repairs take much longer than anticipated, as if the house itself was committed to causing trouble and keeping the family close. Gradually, the family starts experiencing some strange phenomena. Kids are seeing ‘bent-neck ladies’ in the night, hearing strange noises, while Olivia becomes increasingly unhinged, much to Hugh’s concern. 

Inside the house in The Haunting of Hill House
Inside the house in The Haunting of Hill House. Image credit: Steve Dietl/Netflix

Things progress and get worse, until one fateful night when Hugh and the kids are forced to flee and escape Hill House, apparently leaving Olivia behind. What truly happened that night is only explained at the end of the series, when the kids, now adults, return to Hill House with their father to finally learn the truth. 

We don’t want to give too much away, in case you haven’t seen the series yet – if that’s the case, stop reading right now for crying out loud and go binge-watch some Netflix. Basically, the house has a strange grip on each of the members of the Crain family, and many years later it manages to lure them back, one by one, for reasons that are only revealed in the final episode. 

Inside the house in The Haunting of Hill House
Inside the house in The Haunting of Hill House. Image credit: Steve Dietl/Netflix

Is Hill House a real place?

Fortunately, Hill House is an entirely fictional place, so no worries about being inexplicably lured to it like the Crains. However, there is a real place that inspired the look and feel of Hill House, located in LaGrange, Georgia. 

bisham manor
Bisham Manor (courtesy of Zillow)

Dubbed Bisham Manor, the imposing estate at 1901 Old Young’s Mill Road might look like the house in the series, but that’s pretty much where the similarities end. The interior shots were filmed on a set, and they look nothing like the interior of Bisham Manor, which is far from creepy. In fact, Bisham Manor is a popular and charming wedding and event venue, so it’s safe to say it’s attracting visitors for non-evil purposes. 

Bisham manor
Bisham Manor (via Zillow)

Bisham Manor, according to Zillow, boasts roughly 11,000 square feet of space, and is a 1920s English Tudor-style home that was redeveloped in the early 2000s by master-builder Ben Parham. The four-story estate is being used as an event venue for corporate events, meetings and team buildings, weddings, parties, and so on.

Though it might look like an old English castle, it comes decked out with modern amenities like a gym, spa, sauna, steam, wine cellar, and an outdoor pool. Nothing evil about that, as far as we can see. But Bisham’s former owners might disagree.

Interiors at Bisham Manor
Interiors at Bisham Manor (via Zillow)

Neil and Trish Leichty purchased Bisham Manor in 2013, and they reported that the house is definitely haunted by a couple of ghosts of its own. The couple described music playing in the basement despite there being no sound system installed, strange smells permeating throughout the house, and things disappearing in the night.

The Leichtys soon moved to a different home, but continued to experience strange events, much like the Crains were haunted by Hill House decades after they left it. Coincidence? We’ll let you be the judge of that.

If you haven’t watched The Haunting of Hill House, you still have some time until The Haunting of Bly Manor drops on October 9. Prepare to be spooked, but don’t worry, the house is purely fictional. If, on the other hand, you’ve already seen it twice, then check out these other haunted houses we’ve covered here on Fancy Pants Homes. Halloween season is not too far away, so you better start getting ready!

More haunted houses

Behind the Evil Eyes: The (Real) Story of the Amityville House
The Haunting of Thornewood Castle – Where Stephen King Filmed the Rose Red Miniseries
Is It Real? The Creepy House in Stephen King’s ‘It’
The Winchester House — The Haunted Mansion that Inspired the Name of Supernatural’s Winchester Brothers

The post Is It Real? The Creepy Mansion in ‘The Haunting of Hill House’ appeared first on Fancy Pants Homes.

Source: fancypantshomes.com



9 of the Bestselling Home Products of 2020 That You Need To Buy Right Now

best-selling home productsrealtor.com

Perhaps your Christmas haul was missing a few choice items this year. Or maybe you just want to treat yourself in the final throes of 2020 (that in and of itself is worth a celebration, right?). Either way, we think you deserve to buy yourself a little something special right now.

That’s why we took it upon ourselves to scour though the “bestseller” lists from all of our favorite online stores and bring you this roundup of the most popular home products of the year—plus the details on where to get them.

If you’re ready to put those holiday gift cards to good use, keep scrolling, because these bestsellers deserve to make an appearance in your home.

1. Mini waffle maker

2020 home products
Dash mini waffle machine

Amazon

Waffle makers aren’t just the magic stuff of diners and food trucks. They’re also a hugely trending kitchen item, and one that ranked high on many wish lists this season.

“This little nugget has been a hit all year, due to its single serving-sized portions,” says Michelle Harrison-McAllister of Michelle Harrison Design.

“This waffle maker allows you to customize the ingredients for each family member, for a fun and interactive twist. With many people continuing to work from home, there’s no better way to start your day than with a hot breakfast. I’ll be taking the waffle maker into 2021 with me.”

Shop this adorable Dash DMW100WP mini waffle machine ($25) on Amazon.

2. Smart speaker

2020 home products
Echo Dot smart speaker

Amazon

Chances are, if you don’t own one of these smart speakers yet, it’s probably been in your mental shopping cart for a while. It was one of the bestselling home products of 2020, and now might be the perfect time to get one (or a few) for your home.

“As we continue to work from home in 2021, it might be time to give your home office the upgrade it deserves. This small yet mighty device is the perfect size for your nightstand or desk,” says Harrison-McAllister. “Set up reminders throughout the day or simply add some ambiance with music.”

Get a smarter setup for your home with this Echo Dot smart speaker ($40) from Amazon.

3. Home-office chair

2020 home products
Urban Shop swivel mesh office chair

Walmart

While working from the couch seemed like a comfy idea at first, your back probably has told you differently by now. That’s why this comfy, low-key office chair was a bestseller this year.

“This year, we all began to understand how important your desk task chair is for overall health and well-being, including backaches and arm fatigue,” says Harrison-McAllister. “As many of us continue to work from home into the new year, splurging on a desk chair will be so important for comfort.”

Upgrade your home’s ergonomics with one of these Urban Shop swivel mesh office chairs ($40) from Walmart.

4. Milk frother

2020 home products
Zulay original milk frother

Amazon

We all spent more time this year in the kitchen trying to learn how to make our restaurant favorites. But if it’s quality coffee you were missing, look no farther than one of these bestselling milk frothers.

“I’m obsessed with milk frothers—they’re one of those gadgets every kitchen needs,” says Deanne Goodman, a consumer shopping expert at Unicorn Tribe.

“They’re very affordable and make your drinks taste so much better! I use them for hot chocolate, and it’s a game changer. You can froth your morning smoothies, coffee, and more.”

Bring your barista skills to new levels with this Zulay original milk frother ($20) from Amazon.

5. Electric air fryer

2020 home products
GoWISE electric air fryer

Wayfair

As you make your list of kitchen must-haves, you won’t want to miss out on this year’s best-selling electric air fryer. These handy little machines might not sound like much, but trust us when we say they’re the answer to all of your crispy cravings.

“Let’s face it, we all love fried food, but not what it does to our waistline,” says Harrison-McAllister. “Plus, the cleaning that follows preparing fried foods is exhausting. This air fryer became a lifesaver for all of those reasons, allowing us to keep eating the foods we love, while shaving off some calories and cleanup.”

Equip your kitchen with unlimited savory treats with this GoWISE electric air fryer ($190) from Wayfair.

6. Robot vacuum

2020 home products
Lefant robot vacuum cleaner

Amazon

We swear you might start liking your robot vacuum as much as any other member of the family (this writer has even named hers, and decorated it with googly eyes).

“We’re all so tired of cleaning, and most of us don’t have cleaning personnel to help out,” says the designer Alice Benjamin, of Alice Benjamin Interiors. “Once you have a robot vacuum, you’ll wonder why you didn’t have one before!”

Give yourself the gift of clean floors (no matter how much your dog sheds) with this bestselling Lefant robot vacuum cleaner ($160) from Amazon.

7. Linen cabinet

2020 home products
Jesse linen cabinet

Wayfair

Forget minimalism—when it comes to toilet paper, cleaning products, or even just your favorite soap, we’re all guilty of stocking up just a little too much during this never-ending pandemic. But of course we need somewhere to put all those staples.

“Finally, we realize the need to organize every nook and cranny of the house,” says Benjamin. “A linen cabinet like this one becomes a savior to those who need a little more space and calm.”

Whether it’s too many towels, bathroom products, or all of the above and more, this favorite Jesse linen cabinet ($430) from Wayfair is sure to help.

8. Storage basket set

2020 home products
Timeless fabric basket set

Wayfair

If all-around storage is what you need more of in your home, a set of these chic and popular storage baskets might be just the thing.

“Storage basket sets never go out of style,” says Harrison-McAllister. “They can house everything from toilet paper and towels to linens and toys. Not only are these a good investment, but they can also add sanity to your life and design aesthetic.”

Get your Timeless fabric three-piece basket set ($233) from Wayfair.

9. Patio heater

2020 home products
Hampton Bay stainless-steel patio heater

Home Depot

Winter promises to keep us stuffed indoors for another few months, unless of course you make like these smart shoppers, and get yourself a patio heater.

“Patio heaters are such a fun way to sit outside, whether it be during the morning with a cup of coffee, or in the evening with a glass of wine,” says Harrison-McAllister.

“These used to be such a splurge item for homes, but we realize now how beneficial they are to stay cozy outdoors,” she adds. “Being outdoors is something that will continue to be part of our lives in 2021 and will allow us to see a friend or family member in a safer environment. Plus, being with Mother Nature is always in style.”

Make your outdoor social distancing possible this winter with one of these Hampton Bay stainless-steel patio heaters ($149) from Home Depot.

The post 9 of the Bestselling Home Products of 2020 That You Need To Buy Right Now appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

Source: realtor.com



What Does a Real Estate Attorney Do?

If you’re planning to buy or sell a house or a rental investment property, you might consider hiring a real estate attorney.

A real estate lawyer can provide legal protection. They can help you navigate the home-buying process, which can be complex.

In fact, many states require a real estate lawyer to be present at closing. 

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Even if you live in a state that doesn’t require you to have a real estate attorney, it’s important to have one by your side.

But it’s also important to know who you’re dealing with, what they can do for you, and what’s in it for them.

Real estate attorneys can help structure transactions and closing. They will review documents well in advance before the closing to make sure there are no errors.

Real estate lawyers, however, can only represent one of the parties. The buyer and the seller’s interests can often be in conflict. Therefore, the attorney should never represent both parties. 

Besides representing you in sales transactions, real estate attorneys can represent you in a courtroom as well.

During the home-buying process, disputes between the buyer and the seller may arise that will have to settle in court.

The real estate attorney’s qualifications

A real estate attorney, just as any lawyer, has attended 3 years of law school. In law school, they take courses in law in general, including real property and other real estate classes.

During law school, they may do internships at law firms which specialize in real estate law.

Once they graduate law school, they take to bar exam in the state they want to practice in.

Once they become licensed to practice, they can work in a law firm specializing in real estate law.

The real estate lawyer’s fees

A real estate attorney can charge by the hour or a fixed fee. How much their charge for their services depends on their reputation, their level experience, the level of complexity.

Regardless of the fee, your attorney will discuss it with you. Their hourly fee is typically between $150 to $350.

They’ll draft a retainer agreement and make the necessary disclosures before you can retain them.

The attorney’s role in real estate transaction

Real estate attorneys can have many roles. Their roles will vary depending on whether it is a simple transaction or a complex one, and whether a real estate broker is involved.

In some cases, a real estate broker can handle many aspects of real estate transactions. If that case, the real estate attorney’s role is often limited.

In other instances, the real estate lawyer plays a crucial role in all phases of the real estate transaction.

Nonetheless, a real estate attorney’s roles include acting as a legal counselor, negotiator, advisor and coordinator.

Real estate attorney as a legal counselor

A real estate attorney acting as a legal counselor can handle drafting the proposed contract. If there is a broker involved, the broker will prepare the contract.

But, your attorney will review it for any proposed changes. Your lawyer can also draft the deed and examine title documents.

If you retain a real estate agent or broker, your attorney may also review the broker’s agreement before you sign it.

Real estate attorney as a negotiator

If you hire a real estate lawyer before you sign a contract or before engaging in any contract negotiations, your attorney will assume that role. All communications from the other party or his or her attorney will be directed to your lawyer.

Your attorney will negotiate proposed changes to the contract, including the price of the house. They will review any mortgage contingency clauses.

In addition, your real estate attorney can negotiate the following matters:

  • Personal property to be included;
  • Repairs before closing;
  • The closing date;
  • You may not get a mortgage commitment within the stipulated date in the contract. So, your attorney may negotiate an extension of time to obtain the mortgage;
  • You may need an early possession of the house. Your lawyer can negotiate that.

Real estate attorney as an advisor

You, as a client, may not need strict legal advice. You may just want your lawyer to be present for general advice. If you’re a first time home buyer or an elderly buyer, your attorney can also act as an advisor.

Real estate attorney as a coordinator

Your attorney can also act as your coordinator. Residential closings involve a lot of steps. And not everyone involved will follow them.

So, one of your real estate lawyer’s role is to contact the brokers, the title insurers, the mortgagees. They will also monitor the progress of obtaining financing, title policy, etc.

They will also contact the other attorney to make sure all parties are ready for the closing.

Your attorney’s responsibilities before closing

If you hire a real estate lawyer to represent you either as a seller or buyer, his or her responsibility before closing include the following:

  • Make sure you, as a buyer or seller, can fulfill the requirements imposed by the real estate sale contract
  • Review the title insurance;
  • Check the mortgage commitment;
  • Monitor status of the contract contingencies;
  • Examine closing documents for accuracy;
  • Coordinate closing date and time with the mortgage lender, seller and buyer’s broker;
  • If buyers will not attend the closing, obtain power of attorney for property to cover documents to be signed at closing;
  • Get wire instructions for payment of balance due at closing

In case a dispute arises between the parties, the real estate attorney can represent you in court.

Issues that might arise include damages and earnest money forfeiture, specific performance, misrepresentation, etc.

Do I need a real estate attorney?

Some states require a real estate attorney to be present during closing. They include Massachusetts, Maine, Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Florida, Kansas, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, South Carolina, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New York, North Dakota, Mississippi, New Hampshire, and New Jersey.

If you don’t live in any of these states and the District of Columbia, it’s really up to you if you want to hire a real estate attorney. If you’re just trying to save money and can barely afford to buy a house, you’re probably don’t need a real estate lawyer.

But if your real estate transaction is complex, a good real estate attorney can be an asset.

The bottom line…

Some states do not require you to have a real estate attorney during closing. However, it’s worth the cost hiring one especially if you’re buying a house in foreclosure.

Work With A Financial Advisor Near You

If you have questions beyond hiring a real estate attorney, you can talk to a financial advisor who can review your finances and help you reach your goals. Find one who meets your needs with SmartAsset’s free financial advisor matching service. You answer a few questions and they match you with up to three financial advisors in your area. So, if you want help developing a plan to reach your financial goalsget started now.

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The post What Does a Real Estate Attorney Do? appeared first on GrowthRapidly.

Source: growthrapidly.com



10 Home Updates That Are Worth the Money

Homeownership is one of the most time-tested ways to build wealth in the U.S. It can help you build wealth thanks to home appreciation — but this isn’t always guaranteed (just ask anyone who bought a home right before 2008). 

Another way to build wealth through homeownership is by upgrading your home, thereby increasing its value. The idea is that when you eventually sell your home (or pass it on to your heirs) it’ll be worth even more than simply keeping up with basic home maintenance alone. 

And since you spend around 90% of your time indoors, you might as well enjoy your home a bit more while growing its value.

10 Impactful Ways to Raise Your Home’s Value

The opportunities for upgrading your home are endless. But if you’re aiming to boost your home’s value, some upgrades are better than others. You’ll also need to consider whether you feel comfortable with certain DIY projects, or if you prefer to hire a professional. 

You could rig-up a picket fence made of the leg lamps from A Christmas Story if you really wanted to, after all, but chances are it’d decrease your property value (if it didn’t burn down your house in the process, that is). 

Instead, try one of these investment-friendly upgrades, according to the 2020 Cost vs. Value Report from Remodeling Magazine:

  1. Stone Veneer
  2. Garage Door Replacement
  3. Minor Kitchen Remodel
  4. Replace Siding
  5. Replace Windows
  6. Deck Addition
  7. Replace Entry Door
  8. Replace Roof
  9. Remodel Bathroom
  10. Major Kitchen Remodel

1. Stone Veneer

Estimated cost: $9,357

It’s no secret that finding ways to add curb appeal is one of the quickest remodeling wins to increase your home’s value. Right now, one of the hottest trends is adding manufactured stone veneers to the exterior of your home, generally around the base or as accent walls. 

You can DIY this, but it might be better to hire a professional because the materials are expensive. Plus, if you do it wrong, you could waste a lot of money and end up with a wonky result. 

2. Garage Door Replacement

Estimated cost: $3,695

If you’re not keen on spending tens of thousands of dollars, a relatively quick win you can go for is simply replacing your garage door with a better model that includes a lifetime warranty. Again, this is one that’s better left to the pros because it’s an especially dangerous job for newbie DIYers. Besides, installing it yourself is likely to void the warranty anyway.

3. Minor Kitchen Remodel

Estimated cost: $23,452

If you don’t mind sitting around in some construction dust for a little while, doing your own minor kitchen remodel is definitely within the scope of DIYers. It’s also a common home remodel on HGTV and other media. 

To reach the value-add touted by the survey, you’ll need to replace your oven or cooktop, refrigerator, cabinet doors, countertops, drawer fronts, flooring, and add new paint and trim. It requires a lot of changes, but if you have time to watch a few YouTube tutorials, you can do it yourself fairly easily. 

4. Replace Siding

Estimated cost: $14,359 to $17,008

Another big curb-appeal booster is simply replacing your home’s siding. But not all siding is created equal. Fiber-cement siding costs slightly more and recoups slightly more of the cost. The difference, however, isn’t huge and might vary for your individual case. 

Vinyl siding is easier to maintain and install, but isn’t as fire-resistant as fiber-cement — an increasingly important consideration if you live in the arid West. No matter which type you choose, you might need to rent specialized equipment, like scaffolding, unless you’re an NBA athlete working on a single-story house.

5. Replace Windows

Estimated cost: $17,641 to $21,495

Old, leaky, rackety windows aren’t great for curb appeal or energy-efficiency. That’s why replacing them can also be a good idea. If you’re nervous about smashing them (and we wouldn’t blame you), you can hire a professional. Otherwise, it’s a job that’s possible for most DIYers. 

If you have standard-sized windows, you can get ready-made windows from a home supply store. But you’ll likely need to custom-order them to fit your own home. 

6. Deck Addition

Estimated cost: $14,360 to $19,856

Decks are one of the easiest home additions to DIY, as long as you have basic carpentry and tool safety skills. You can take your time with decks since they’re outside of your home and not directly in your everyday living space. Composite decks are slightly more expensive than wooden decks but have the advantage of longevity and less maintenance necessary over the years.

7. Replace Entry Door

Estimated cost: $1,881

Another easy and low-cost project, replacing the front door gives you an instant boost to your curb appeal. Just about anyone can do it with the help of YouTube video tutorials and a good, strong arm. 

8. Replace Roof

Estimated cost: $24,700 to $40,318

Your roof is literally the cap to your home. Replacing the roof is a big job, and although hammering in shingles seems easy (and it is), it’s generally best left to the professionals. A professionally-installed roof comes with a warranty, and takes a day or two to complete.

If you DIY this home improvement project, you’ll lose the warranty, and it could take you longer to complete the job. And the longer your roofing project lingers, the longer your home is vulnerable to damage. 

Another point to remember — metal roofs are far more expensive than asphalt shingle roofs, but they also tend to last longer and require less maintenance.

9. Remodel Bathroom

Estimated cost: $21,377 to $34,643

As long as you’re not making major changes to the plumbing and electrical systems underlying the fixtures, a bathroom remodel is possible on your own. This is an especially common remodel for many DIYers, because along with the kitchen and the bedroom, it’s a daily-use room. 

10. Major Kitchen Remodel

Estimated cost: $68,490 to $135,547

If you’re looking to bring a 1950s-style kitchen into the 21st century, it’ll take a bit more than some extra spit and glue. You’ll need to make big changes, like adding in a vented range hood for those blackened-fish tacos, new recessed and under-cabinet lighting, new cabinets, and even adding in an island for better cooking options. For that reason, it’s usually better to hire a professional team who can make sure everything’s wired up right. 

Your Mileage May Vary

Here’s something to consider: on average, you’ll only recoup a portion of your cost if you complete the upgrade and then sell your home in the same year. That might seem a bit disappointing — shouldn’t you be able to recoup all of the cost, and then some?

Remember, your specific case might be very different depending on a lot of factors, like what area of your home could use work. For example, if your exterior looks tired and the siding is falling off, upgrading that rather than adding a new deck might give you a better payoff. 

Another factor affecting your return on investment is how long you let your home’s value appreciate, before selling it. Adding a stone veneer can help you recoup 96% of your cost in the first year. However, in the second year, consider whether you can boost the value of your home by more than you paid for the upgrade. 

If you plan on selling your home in the future, asking a local realtor or real estate investor which upgrades are best for your particular home can be worthwhile. After all, market conditions vary dramatically cross the country and no two homes are exactly the same. 

The post 10 Home Updates That Are Worth the Money appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com



Starting Life on the Right Foot with Real Estate: A short story

Mo and Sarah worked very hard to buy a house. They saved money, they took care of their credit, and they took their time finding the right house. They were young and had their whole lives ahead of them but they did not want to waste their youth either. They also knew that the sooner … Read more

Source: investfourmore.com




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